HIGHLY POTENT NEWS THAT MIGHT CHANGE YOUR VIEWS

surveillance

Don’t Replace Facebook, Disrupt It

LocalOrg

November 11, 2014 (Tony Cartalucci – LocalOrg) – Facebook is a problem. It is undoubtedly being used by special interests to manipulate and monitor entire populations both within the United States and well beyond. It represents a tool that in no way serves the people actually using it, and instead allows special interests to use the users. It is a dream global panopticon for the abusive dictators that run Western society and presume dominion over what they call an “international order.”

But in order to counter this threat, Facebook cannot simply be “replaced.” It specifically, and what it represents, must be disrupted entirely.

Facebook is a Skinner Box for Humans 

Facebook has been at the center of several recent controversies that are increasingly leaving users disillusioned and in search of alternatives. At the center of these controversies is Facebook’s “news feed” feature. Ideally, news feed would work by showing on your timeline updates from those individuals and organizations you follow. There are two options for news feed – “most recent” and “top stories.” Facebook has decided to upend this feature by insidiously controlling what appears on your news feed regardless of which option you select. 

Now, you will no longer receive regular updates from accounts you follow, and instead will see a “filtered” version determined by Facebook’s algorithms. Many Facebook users are unaware of this fact and are perplexed as to why they are no longer receiving regular updates from accounts they follow.

[...CONTINUE READING THIS ARTICLE]


Silicon Valley startup unveils Internet-connected smart guns for cops — video included

Canadian Awareness Network
Oct 30, 2014

Real-time data on location, and when weapons are being unholstered and fired.

by David Kravets – Oct 24 2014, 12:30pm EDT

A Silicon Valley startup said Friday that police agencies were field testing its new product: a wireless sensor that transforms officers’ weapons into smart guns with real-time telemetry.

Yardarm Technologies’ sensor is a small device that goes inside gun handles and provides dispatchers with real-time geo-location tracking information on the weapon. The Yardarm Sensor also sends alerts when a weapon is unholstered or fired, and it can “record the direction of aim, providing real-time tactical value for commanders and providing crime scene investigators valuable data for prosecution,” the company said.

The 10-employee company based in Capitola, California, said it was deploying the technology on a trial basis. The first takers have been the Santa Cruz County Sheriff’s Department in California and the Carrollton Police Department in Texas.

“By connecting the firearm to the cloud, we give departments a technology that enhances officer safety, improves operational efficiency, and builds community trust,” Jim Schaff, a Yardarm vice president, said.
The announcement comes as the public is seeking more accountability of officers following the August 9 shooting in Ferguson, Missouri, of unarmed 18-year-old Michael Brown. The shooting has prompted widespread protests and left some demanding a technological solution.

In response, the Ferguson Police Department began equipping its officers with body cameras so that officers may record their daily patrols. Police departments elsewhere have also started using body cameras, and others are exploring the idea. A White House petition with 154,000-plus signatures is demanding that all police in the US “wear a camera.”

While it won’t capture the details of all of an officer’s interactions with the public, the Yardarm device may provide critical information. Santa Cruz County Sheriff Phil Wowak was highly optimistic that the sensors would bolster accountability. “A law enforcement leader’s ultimate responsibility is to keep their staff and the public safe at all times,” Wowak said. “Yardarm’s technology is a groundbreaking way to do just that, and every sheriff and police chief worldwide should be looking at this product for the future of their department.”

Yardarm is also marketing the technology to private security firms and the military. It hopes to capitalize not just on its hardware but on subscription fees from dispatcher software makers.

The sensors put into gun handles are connected via Bluetooth to a law enforcement official’s smartphone, which sends the data to Yardarm’s servers. The data is then routed to police departments in encrypted form, the company said.

The 18-month-old startup has raised about $1.5 million so far and has radically altered its business model. Initially, the company focused on the consumer firearms market, but it ran into controversy. It was hawking technology that would allow private gun owners the ability to remotely lock a weapon. If a weapon was moved—or stolen—an alarm would alert the owner’s mobile phone. The owner would have the option to remotely disable the weapon from being fired.

But gun rights advocates, like the National Rifle Association, say smart guns could limit Second Amendment rights. “NRA recognizes that the ‘smart guns’ issue clearly has the potential to mesh with the anti-gunner’s agenda, opening the door to a ban on all guns that do not possess the government-required technology,” the group said. Marketing to the police and military would avoid this potential controversy.

Listing image by Yardarm Technologies

Read More Here

 


Brain decoder can eavesdrop on your inner voice

Researchers Manipulate Neurons in Worms' Brains and Take Control of Their BehaviorIntellihub.com
Oct 30, 2014

As you read this, your neurons are firing – that brain activity can now be decoded to reveal the silent words in your head

New Scientist

TALKING to yourself used to be a strictly private pastime. That’s no longer the case – researchers have eavesdropped on our internal monologue for the first time. The achievement is a step towards helping people who cannot physically speak communicate with the outside world.

“If you’re reading text in a newspaper or a book, you hear a voice in your own head,” says Brian Pasley at the University of California, Berkeley. “We’re trying to decode the brain activity related to that voice to create a medical prosthesis that can allow someone who is paralysed or locked in to speak.”

When you hear someone speak, sound waves activate sensory neurons in your inner ear. These neurons pass information to areas of the brain where different aspects of the sound are extracted and interpreted as words.

Read Full Article


Ello -The Facebook Killer?

Land Destroyer

September 26, 2014 (Tony Cartalucci – LocalOrg) – Ello, a social network alternative to Facebook is expanding its user base immensely, even as it remains in beta testing. Market watchers and tech trend analysts attribute the influx of users indicative of Facebook’s waning popularity due to its invasive, profit-driven, monopolistic, and downright creepy conduct. 

Facebook’s incremental, manipulative policy and terms of use have been described as everything from a greedy business practice, to a government sanctioned means of mass manipulation and soft censorship.

It was inevitable that start-ups and activists would seek to offer Facebook users an alternative that allowed social media to be used as a tool of empowerment, not insidious manipulation and censorship. Ello appears to be tapping into that with its manifesto which states:

Your social network is owned by advertisers.

Every post you share, every friend you make and every link you follow is tracked, recorded and converted into data. Advertisers buy your data so they can show you more ads. You are the product that’s bought and sold.

We believe there is a better way. We believe in audacity. We believe in beauty, simplicity and transparency. We believe that the people who make things and the people who use them should be in partnership.

We believe a social network can be a tool for empowerment. Not a tool to deceive, coerce and manipulate — but a place to connect, create and celebrate life.
You are not a product.

In theory, not only does Ello’s manifesto sound ideal, it is likely to attract a multitude of disillusioned Facebook users fed up with the big-tech’s monopoly, but who have stayed aboard for a lack of a better alternative.

Market Watch in an article titled, “Facebook killer called Ello gets the timing right,” reported:

There has been a lot of chatter on social media this week about a new social network called Ello, which is getting buzz for its anti-Facebook Inc. stance. But is the start-up, which accepts no advertising and does no data mining, ready for prime time?

Ello has apparently been gaining such a huge influx of new users that its servers were having problems in the past two days, despite the requirement that you need an invitation to join.

Market Watch notes that Ello’s popularity is due more to Facebook’s shortcomings than Ello’s superior performance – Ello which is admittedly still in beta testing and with features still being incrementally added.

[...CONTINUE READING THIS ARTICLE]


I’m terrified of my new TV: Why I’m scared to turn this thing on — and you’d be, too

by Michael Price
Salon.com
Oct 30, 2014

(Credit: cobalt88 via Shutterstock)

From facial recognition to personal data collection, this thing is downright scary — and so are the implications

I just bought a new TV. The old one had a good run, but after the volume got stuck on 63, I decided it was time to replace it. I am now the owner of a new “smart” TV, which promises to deliver streaming multimedia content, games, apps, social media and Internet browsing. Oh, and TV too.

The only problem is that I’m now afraid to use it. You would be too — if you read through the 46-page privacy policy.

The amount of data this thing collects is staggering. It logs where, when, how and for how long you use the TV. It sets tracking cookies and beacons designed to detect “when you have viewed particular content or a particular email message.” It records “the apps you use, the websites you visit, and how you interact with content.” It ignores “do-not-track” requests as a considered matter of policy.

It also has a built-in camera — with facial recognition. The purpose is to provide “gesture control” for the TV and enable you to log in to a personalized account using your face. On the upside, the images are saved on the TV instead of uploaded to a corporate server. On the downside, the Internet connection makes the whole TV vulnerable to hackers who have demonstrated the ability to take complete control of the machine.

More troubling is the microphone. The TV boasts a “voice recognition” feature that allows viewers to control the screen with voice commands. But the service comes with a rather ominous warning: “Please be aware that if your spoken words include personal or other sensitive information, that information will be among the data captured and transmitted to a third party.” Got that? Don’t say personal or sensitive stuff in front of the TV.

You may not be watching, but the telescreen is listening.

I do not doubt that this data is important to providing customized content and convenience, but it is also incredibly personal, constitutionally protected information that should not be for sale to advertisers and should require a warrant for law enforcement to access.

Unfortunately, current law affords little privacy protection to so-called “third party records,” including email, telephone records, and data stored in “the cloud.” Much of the data captured and transmitted by my new TV would likely fall into this category. Although one federal court of appeals has found this rule unconstitutional with respect to email, the principle remains a bedrock of modern electronic surveillance.

According to retired Gen. David Petraeus, former head of the CIA, Internet-enabled “smart” devices can be exploited to reveal a wealth of personal data. “Items of interest will be located, identified, monitored, and remotely controlled through technologies such as radio-frequency identification, sensor networks, tiny embedded servers, and energy harvester,” he reportedly told a venture capital firm in 2012. “We’ll spy on you through your dishwasher,” read one headline. Indeed, as the “Internet of Things” matures, household appliances and physical objects will become more networked. Your ceiling lights, thermostat and washing machine — even your socks — may be wired to interact online. The FBI will not have to bug your living room; you will do it yourself.

[...CONTINUE READING THIS ARTICLE]


FBI pretended to be Seattle newspaper in order to hack suspect’s computer

End the Lie
Oct 28, 2014

image

Screenshot from http://seattletimes.com

The editor of the Pulitzer Prize-winning Seattle Times newspaper says she’s “outraged” to learn only this week that the FBI made a mock-up of the publication’s website in 2007 in order to spread spyware onto the computer of a suspect.

When agents with the Seattle division of the FBI swarmed the home of a 15-year-old high school student that year and charged him with making bomb threats, media reports noted that the arrest was made possible with the use of a so-called “Computer & Internet Protocol Address Verifier” program, or CIPAV, that had been remotely installed on the individual’s machine to collect and then communicate to the authorities the user-specific information that eventually identified the suspect. The student later pleaded guilty to emailing repeated bomb threats to Timberline High School and was sentenced to 90 days in juvenile detention.

Until this week, how the FBI actually went about sneaking the CIPAV program onto the student’s computer was a matter that went unreported. After digging through a trove of emails previously obtained through a Freedom of Information Act request, however, American Civil Liberties Union technologist Chris Soghoian stumbled upon details this week showing that authorities accomplished the installation by sending a malicious link disguised as a Seattle Times news article to a social media account used by their suspect.

[...CONTINUE READING THIS ARTICLE]


VIDEO — What Happened In Ottawa?

Press For Truth
Oct 22, 2014

“Despite the mass surveillance and increased police powers – all for our safety of course – the authorities have not only been unable to prevent terrorist attacks, they’re actions have actually ensured these attacks occur in Canada!”

Follow Dan Dicks:
on Facebook ➜ http://www.facebook.com/PressForTruth
on Instagram ➜ http://instagram.com/dandickspft
on Twitter ➜ http://twitter.com/#!/DanDicksPFThttps://twitter.com/PressForTruth

Subscribe:
Youtube ➜ http://www.youtube.com/weavingspider
Press For Truth TV ➜ http://www.patreon.com/PressForTruth

Support Press For Truth:
Patreon ➜ http://www.patreon.com/PressForTruth
Donate ➜ https://www.paypal.com/cgi-bin/webscr…
Get PFT Gear ➜ http://www.pressfortruth.ca/category/…

If you do not use PayPal or credit cards you can still donate! You can send an etransfer to dan@pressfortruth.ca. We also accept checks, money orders, cash and equipment.With good old fashion mail you can send Dan stuff to:

Press For Truth
2574 St. Clair Ave West
Unit 1 Suite #181
Toronto On, M6N 1L8
Canada

Visit http://pressfortruth.ca/


VIDEO — Magnus Olsson: Transhumanist Agenda are mind stealers! Conference to feature NSA whistleblower

Alfred Lambremont Webre
Oct 9, 2014

Magnus Olsson: Transhumanist Agenda are mind-stealers! Brussels conference to feature NSA whistleblower William Binney
http://exopolitics.blogs.com/peaceins…


MADA: Over 80% of Palestinian Journalists Self-Censor

nsnbc international
Oct 17, 2014

IMEMC : The Palestinian Center for Development and Media Freedoms (MADA) released a report, on Thursday, estimating that over 80 percent of Palestinian journalists were engaged in self-censorship.

The group released a report of its findings following two studies, along with a meeting on self-censorship and its impact on freedom of expression and media in Palestine, according to Ma’an News Agency.

PBC_Palestine_TV antennaMousa Rimawi, general director of MADA, said that self-censorship is the most “serious and dangerous kind of censorship” journalists face, noting that the practice began during the Israeli occupation prior to the establishment of the Palestinian Authority.

Mr. Rimawi said that direct censorship by Israeli authorities during the First Intifada, in the late eighties, led to self-censorship among Palestinian journalists as media outlets used different methods of skirting Israeli restrictions on media output.

Self-censorship continued after the creation of the PA, Rimawi said, and has escalated “concretely and dangerously” since the 2007 split between Hamas and Fateh.

Ma’an further reports that, during a meeting entitled “Self-censorship: Is there a way to get rid of it?”, dozens of journalists and media students were presented with the results of two studies by MADA which revealed that some 80 percent of journalists surveyed practiced self-censorship on some or all of the material which they had written or produced.

Over 68 percent of journalists claim that their work, or their colleagues’ work, had been banned from being published, at one time or another, by their employer.

They also explained that the practice of self-censorship was related not only to official institutions, but also to fears that society and publishers are not willing to discuss taboo subjects.

MADA released a statement, in December of 2013, which documented “worrying violations” against media freedoms in the occupied West Bank and the Gaza Strip.

The report noted several arbitrary arrests of journalists by PA forces in the West Bank, as well as Hamas security forces in Gaza.

IMEMC


VIDEO — School uses flying DRONE surveillance to stop students from cheating in exams

Canadian Awareness Network
Oct 2, 2014

Thomas Moore College in Belgium is experimenting with using remote controlled UAV to catch students cheating on their tests

A Belgian school has found a surprising new use for flying drones – making sure students don’t cheat on their exams.

Teachers at Thomas Moore College, in Belgium, are testing out the remote controlled aircraft to keep an eye on students during tests.

DJI Phantom drones are equipped with GoPro cameras to fly around the exam room, looking down on students as they work.

The technology has a way to go before being used for real, though as the drones only have a flight time of around 15 minutes – less than even the shortest exam.

There’s also the problem of the wind pushed out by the drone’s propellers – which could make a mess of exam papers.

 

Read More Here


9 Epic Failures of Regulating Cryptography

Activist Post
Sept 27, 2014

Recently Apple has announced that it is providing basic encryption on mobile devices that they cannot bypass, even in response to a request from law enforcement. Google has promised to take similar steps in the near future. Predictably, law enforcement has responded with howls of alarm .

We’ve seen this movie before. Below is a slightly adapted blog post from one we posted in 2010, the last time the FBI was seriously hinting that it was going to try to mandate that all communications systems be easily wiretappable by mandating “back doors” into any encryption systems. We marshaled eight “epic failures” of regulating crypto at that time, all of which are still salient today. And in honor of the current debate, we’ve added a ninth.

They can promise strong encryption. They just need to figure out how they can provide us plain text. – FBI General Counsel Valerie Caproni, September 27, 2010

[W]e’re in favor of strong encryption, robust encryption. The country needs it, industry needs it. We just want to make sure we have a trap door and key under some judge’s authority where we can get there if somebody is planning a crime. – FBI Director Louis Freeh, May 11, 1995

If the government howls of protest at the idea that people will be using encryption sound familiar, it’s because regulating and controlling consumer use of encryption was a monstrous proposal officially declared dead in 2001 after threatening Americans’ privacy, free speech rights, and innovation for nearly a decade. But like a zombie, it’s now rising from the grave, bringing the same disastrous flaws with it.


Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 909 other followers