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More Circumcision Myths You May Believe: Hygiene and STDs

circumcisionPsychology Today

Is circumcision cleaner and healthier?

There’s a lot of hype about how circumcision is better for a man’s health. But is it really?Here is Part 2 of our series on myths about circumcision.

NOTE: Primary author is Lillian Dell’Aquila Cannon (see her blog)

Myth: You have to get the baby circumcised because it is really hard to keep a baby’s penis clean.

Reality check: In babies, the foreskin is completely fused to the head of the penis.  You cannot and should not retract it to clean it, as this would cause the child pain, and is akin to trying to clean the inside of a baby girl’s vagina.  The infant foreskin is perfectly designed to protect the head of the penis and keep feces out.  All you have to do is wipe the outside of the penis like a finger.  It is harder to keep circumcised baby’s penis clean because you have to carefully clean around the wound, make sure no feces got into the wound, and apply ointment.

Myth: Little boys won’t clean under their foreskins and will get infections.

Reality check:  The foreskin separates and retracts on its own sometime between age 3 and puberty.  Before it retracts on its own, you wipe the outside off like a finger.  After it retracts on its own, it will get clean during the boy’s shower or bath.  Once a boy discovers this cool, new feature of his penis, he will often retract the foreskin himself during his bath or shower, and you can encourage him to rinse it off. But he should not use soap as this upsets the natural balance and is very irritating.  There is nothing special that the parents need to do.  Most little boys have absolutely no problem playing with their penises in the shower or anywhere else!  It was harder to teach my boys to wash their hair than it was to care for their penises.  (Camille 2002)

Myth:  Uncircumcised penises get smelly smegma.

Reality check:  Actually, smegma is produced by the genitals of both women and men during the reproductive years.  Smegma is made of sebum and skin cells and lubricates the foreskin and glans in men, and the clitoral hood and inner labia in women.  It is rinsed off during normal bathing and does not cause cancer or any other health problems.

Myth:  “My uncle wasn’t circumcised and he kept getting infections and had to be circumcised as an adult.”

Reality check:  Medical advice may have promoted infection in uncircumcised males. A shocking number of doctors are uneducated about the normal development of the foreskin, and they (incorrectly) tell parents that they have to retract the baby’s foreskin and wash inside it at every diaper change.  Doing this tears the foreskin and the tissue (called synechia) that connects it to the head of the penis, leading to scarring and infection.

Misinformation was especially prevalent during the 1950s and 60s, when most babies were circumcised and we didn’t know as much about the care of the intact penis, which is why the story is always about someone’s uncle.  Doing this to a baby boy would be like trying to clean the inside of a baby girl’s vagina with Q-tips at every diaper change. Rather than preventing problems, such practices would cause problems by introducing harmful bacteria.  Remember that humans evolved from animals, so no body part that required special care would survive evolutionary pressures.  The human genitals are wonderfully self-cleaning and require no special care.

[READ MORE…]

[hat tip: Stefan Molyneux]

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