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Spain

VIDEO — ‘Can’t pepper spray a ghost’: Holograms parade in Madrid enraged over anti-protest ‘gag law’

RT
Apr 13, 2015

A new Spanish law restricting public protests is met with a wave of anger – with activists calling it a crackdown on freedom of speech.

[SHOW NOTES]

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Catalonian Secession, and the Second Spanish Civil War

cataloniaby Joshua Krause
The Daily Sheeple
Sept 29, 2014

Nestled along the coast of Spain, is the ancient city of Barcelona and the surrounding countryside that make up the state of Catalonia. Within its borders, lives an old and storied people, with their own language, culture, and even its own parliament separate from the legislative bodies in Madrid. They are by far, one of the most Independent regions within the European Union. Don’t tell that to Spain’s central government though. As far as they’re concerned, Catalonia is just another vassal state with a tax base.

Since the early 20th century, Catalonia has seen a massive resurgence of its nationalist movement. Despite being brutally suppressed by the Franco regime, the movement made a comeback in the late 70′s and 80′s, and managed to secure several autonomous rights in the process.

Fast forward to the present day, and now we see the secession sentiments stronger than ever, as the people of Catalonia try to separate themselves from the nation of Spain. And they should. Spain, like many of the European Union’s southern members, is a total basket-case with an enormous unemployment rate, a large class of welfare dependent citizens, and debt levels so high it would make a casino blush.

As is to be expected with most nations, the central government refuses to allow them to strike out on their own. They continue to claim that their constitution allows no such right, as if a contract that doesn’t protect the right to self-determination is binding in any way. Despite these setbacks, the state of Catalonia has decided to go ahead with a non-binding secession referendum, in defiance of Spain’s demands:

The Catalan leader, Artur Mas, formally called a November referendum on independence on Saturday, in a show of defiance that puts the wealthy north-east region of Spain on a collision course with the central government in Madrid.

Mas’s signature on a decree allowing the vote to go forward came one week after the Catalan parliament passed a law paving the way for non-binding consultations in the region. As the solemn signing ceremony took place yesterday morning, government officials crowded around the document, excitedly snapping photographs on their mobile phones.

Catalonia has the right to decide its political future,” said Mas. “We know that democracy is the most civilised way to resolve difficulties between nations.” The 9 November referendum would see two questions put to Catalans: whether Catalonia should be a state and, if so, whether it should be an independent state.

Despite the referendum being non-binding, not unlike a straw poll, the government of Spain has the gall to claim that it too is unconstitutional. And while they blast the public with their high minded rhetoric of unity and solidarity, nobody doubts their true motives for preventing this separation:

Proud of their Catalan language and culture, but suffering in an economic crisis, many of the 7.5 million people in Catalonia say they feel short-changed by the central government which redistributes their taxes.

Catalonia was there at the symbolic birth of Spain when Queen Isabella of Castile and King Ferdinand of Aragon, a region that included Catalonia, married in 1469. Now Catalonia accounts for one-fifth of Spain’s total output and an even greater share of its exports.

Catalonia is one of the few regions that gives more than it takes back. Their percentage of the GPD is higher than their percentage of the population, and the people are sick and tired of giving their tax dollars to failing system. They are a region that has historically, been marginalized and persecuted by a central government that doesn’t much care for their customs and institutions. If Catalonia goes, it’s doubtful that the Basques will stick around for much longer. It would essentially put an end to the nation of Spain as we know it, and the drop in tax dollars would push them further over the fiscal cliff.

[…CONTINUE READING THIS ARTICLE]

Nestled along the coast of Spain, is the ancient city of Barcelona and the surrounding countryside that make up the state of Catalonia. Within its borders, lives an old and storied people, with their own language, culture, and even its own parliament separate from the legislative bodies in Madrid. They are by far, one of the most Independent regions within the European Union. Don’t tell that to Spain’s central government though. As far as they’re concerned, Catalonia is just another vassal state with a tax base.

Since the early 20th century, Catalonia has seen a massive resurgence of its nationalist movement. Despite being brutally suppressed by the Franco regime, the movement made a comeback in the late 70′s and 80′s, and managed to secure several autonomous rights in the process.

Fast forward to the present day, and now we see the secession sentiments stronger than ever, as the people of Catalonia try to separate themselves from the nation of Spain. And they should. Spain, like many of the European Union’s southern members, is a total basket-case with an enormous unemployment rate, a large class of welfare dependent citizens, and debt levels so high it would make a casino blush.

As is to be expected with most nations, the central government refuses to allow them to strike out on their own. They continue to claim that their constitution allows no such right, as if a contract that doesn’t protect the right to self-determination is binding in any way. Despite these setbacks, the state of Catalonia has decided to go ahead with a non-binding secession referendum, in defiance of Spain’s demands:

The Catalan leader, Artur Mas, formally called a November referendum on independence on Saturday, in a show of defiance that puts the wealthy north-east region of Spain on a collision course with the central government in Madrid.

Mas’s signature on a decree allowing the vote to go forward came one week after the Catalan parliament passed a law paving the way for non-binding consultations in the region. As the solemn signing ceremony took place yesterday morning, government officials crowded around the document, excitedly snapping photographs on their mobile phones.

Catalonia has the right to decide its political future,” said Mas. “We know that democracy is the most civilised way to resolve difficulties between nations.” The 9 November referendum would see two questions put to Catalans: whether Catalonia should be a state and, if so, whether it should be an independent state.

Despite the referendum being non-binding, not unlike a straw poll, the government of Spain has the gall to claim that it too is unconstitutional. And while they blast the public with their high minded rhetoric of unity and solidarity, nobody doubts their true motives for preventing this separation:

Proud of their Catalan language and culture, but suffering in an economic crisis, many of the 7.5 million people in Catalonia say they feel short-changed by the central government which redistributes their taxes.

Catalonia was there at the symbolic birth of Spain when Queen Isabella of Castile and King Ferdinand of Aragon, a region that included Catalonia, married in 1469. Now Catalonia accounts for one-fifth of Spain’s total output and an even greater share of its exports.

Catalonia is one of the few regions that gives more than it takes back. Their percentage of the GPD is higher than their percentage of the population, and the people are sick and tired of giving their tax dollars to failing system. They are a region that has historically, been marginalized and persecuted by a central government that doesn’t much care for their customs and institutions. If Catalonia goes, it’s doubtful that the Basques will stick around for much longer. It would essentially put an end to the nation of Spain as we know it, and the drop in tax dollars would push them further over the fiscal cliff.

Moreover, the central government has quietly hinted at the repercussions the Catalans will face, if they attempt to leave Spain:

“Spain is an indissoluble nation. In case of threat of fracture or separatism, according to article 8 of the Spanish Constitution, we have to guarantee the integrity of the territory. Therefore, it is our opinion that we have to declare a state of war or siege.” This is the opinion of the president of the Spanish Military Association (AME), Colonel Leopoldo Muñoz Sánchez. These are the words of Colonel Muñoz who expressed his opinion on behalf of one of the three largest military associations in Spain, who gave an interview regarding the current political issue in Catalonia that was shown on Dutch television channel “Niewsur”

Funny, Section 8 of their constitution talks about defending their sovereignty and independence, but makes no mention secession. I guess violating the spirit and intent of the constitution, isn’t just an American habit.

If the political class in Spain continues to ignore the wishes of their industrious province, and is prepared to violate their own constitution, they may very well have a war on their hands. The last time they had such a war, 500,000 people died, and the nation was left under a fascist dictatorship for nearly 40 years…

spanish civil war

…But no, they can’t just get their fiscal house in order, and let their countrymen leave on friendly terms. They must do everything in their power to keep their passengers at gunpoint, on a sinking ship.

Delivered by The Daily Sheeple


Contributed by Joshua Krause of The Daily Sheeple.

Joshua Krause is a reporter, writer and researcher at The Daily Sheeple. He was born and raised in the Bay Area and is a freelance writer and author. You can follow Joshua’s reports at Facebook or on his personal Twitter. Joshua’s website is Strange Danger .

– See more at: http://www.thedailysheeple.com/catalonian-secession-and-the-approaching-spanish-civil-war_092014#sthash.44D3PvXV.dpuf

Nestled along the coast of Spain, is the ancient city of Barcelona and the surrounding countryside that make up the state of Catalonia. Within its borders, lives an old and storied people, with their own language, culture, and even its own parliament separate from the legislative bodies in Madrid. They are by far, one of the most Independent regions within the European Union. Don’t tell that to Spain’s central government though. As far as they’re concerned, Catalonia is just another vassal state with a tax base.

Since the early 20th century, Catalonia has seen a massive resurgence of its nationalist movement. Despite being brutally suppressed by the Franco regime, the movement made a comeback in the late 70′s and 80′s, and managed to secure several autonomous rights in the process.

Fast forward to the present day, and now we see the secession sentiments stronger than ever, as the people of Catalonia try to separate themselves from the nation of Spain. And they should. Spain, like many of the European Union’s southern members, is a total basket-case with an enormous unemployment rate, a large class of welfare dependent citizens, and debt levels so high it would make a casino blush.

As is to be expected with most nations, the central government refuses to allow them to strike out on their own. They continue to claim that their constitution allows no such right, as if a contract that doesn’t protect the right to self-determination is binding in any way. Despite these setbacks, the state of Catalonia has decided to go ahead with a non-binding secession referendum, in defiance of Spain’s demands:

The Catalan leader, Artur Mas, formally called a November referendum on independence on Saturday, in a show of defiance that puts the wealthy north-east region of Spain on a collision course with the central government in Madrid.

Mas’s signature on a decree allowing the vote to go forward came one week after the Catalan parliament passed a law paving the way for non-binding consultations in the region. As the solemn signing ceremony took place yesterday morning, government officials crowded around the document, excitedly snapping photographs on their mobile phones.

Catalonia has the right to decide its political future,” said Mas. “We know that democracy is the most civilised way to resolve difficulties between nations.” The 9 November referendum would see two questions put to Catalans: whether Catalonia should be a state and, if so, whether it should be an independent state.

Despite the referendum being non-binding, not unlike a straw poll, the government of Spain has the gall to claim that it too is unconstitutional. And while they blast the public with their high minded rhetoric of unity and solidarity, nobody doubts their true motives for preventing this separation:

Proud of their Catalan language and culture, but suffering in an economic crisis, many of the 7.5 million people in Catalonia say they feel short-changed by the central government which redistributes their taxes.

Catalonia was there at the symbolic birth of Spain when Queen Isabella of Castile and King Ferdinand of Aragon, a region that included Catalonia, married in 1469. Now Catalonia accounts for one-fifth of Spain’s total output and an even greater share of its exports.

Catalonia is one of the few regions that gives more than it takes back. Their percentage of the GPD is higher than their percentage of the population, and the people are sick and tired of giving their tax dollars to failing system. They are a region that has historically, been marginalized and persecuted by a central government that doesn’t much care for their customs and institutions. If Catalonia goes, it’s doubtful that the Basques will stick around for much longer. It would essentially put an end to the nation of Spain as we know it, and the drop in tax dollars would push them further over the fiscal cliff.

Moreover, the central government has quietly hinted at the repercussions the Catalans will face, if they attempt to leave Spain:

“Spain is an indissoluble nation. In case of threat of fracture or separatism, according to article 8 of the Spanish Constitution, we have to guarantee the integrity of the territory. Therefore, it is our opinion that we have to declare a state of war or siege.” This is the opinion of the president of the Spanish Military Association (AME), Colonel Leopoldo Muñoz Sánchez. These are the words of Colonel Muñoz who expressed his opinion on behalf of one of the three largest military associations in Spain, who gave an interview regarding the current political issue in Catalonia that was shown on Dutch television channel “Niewsur”

Funny, Section 8 of their constitution talks about defending their sovereignty and independence, but makes no mention secession. I guess violating the spirit and intent of the constitution, isn’t just an American habit.

If the political class in Spain continues to ignore the wishes of their industrious province, and is prepared to violate their own constitution, they may very well have a war on their hands. The last time they had such a war, 500,000 people died, and the nation was left under a fascist dictatorship for nearly 40 years…

spanish civil war

…But no, they can’t just get their fiscal house in order, and let their countrymen leave on friendly terms. They must do everything in their power to keep their passengers at gunpoint, on a sinking ship.

Delivered by The Daily Sheeple


Contributed by Joshua Krause of The Daily Sheeple.

Joshua Krause is a reporter, writer and researcher at The Daily Sheeple. He was born and raised in the Bay Area and is a freelance writer and author. You can follow Joshua’s reports at Facebook or on his personal Twitter. Joshua’s website is Strange Danger .

– See more at: http://www.thedailysheeple.com/catalonian-secession-and-the-approaching-spanish-civil-war_092014#sthash.44D3PvXV.dpuf

Nestled along the coast of Spain, is the ancient city of Barcelona and the surrounding countryside that make up the state of Catalonia. Within its borders, lives an old and storied people, with their own language, culture, and even its own parliament separate from the legislative bodies in Madrid. They are by far, one of the most Independent regions within the European Union. Don’t tell that to Spain’s central government though. As far as they’re concerned, Catalonia is just another vassal state with a tax base.

Since the early 20th century, Catalonia has seen a massive resurgence of its nationalist movement. Despite being brutally suppressed by the Franco regime, the movement made a comeback in the late 70′s and 80′s, and managed to secure several autonomous rights in the process.

Fast forward to the present day, and now we see the secession sentiments stronger than ever, as the people of Catalonia try to separate themselves from the nation of Spain. And they should. Spain, like many of the European Union’s southern members, is a total basket-case with an enormous unemployment rate, a large class of welfare dependent citizens, and debt levels so high it would make a casino blush.

As is to be expected with most nations, the central government refuses to allow them to strike out on their own. They continue to claim that their constitution allows no such right, as if a contract that doesn’t protect the right to self-determination is binding in any way. Despite these setbacks, the state of Catalonia has decided to go ahead with a non-binding secession referendum, in defiance of Spain’s demands:

The Catalan leader, Artur Mas, formally called a November referendum on independence on Saturday, in a show of defiance that puts the wealthy north-east region of Spain on a collision course with the central government in Madrid.

Mas’s signature on a decree allowing the vote to go forward came one week after the Catalan parliament passed a law paving the way for non-binding consultations in the region. As the solemn signing ceremony took place yesterday morning, government officials crowded around the document, excitedly snapping photographs on their mobile phones.

Catalonia has the right to decide its political future,” said Mas. “We know that democracy is the most civilised way to resolve difficulties between nations.” The 9 November referendum would see two questions put to Catalans: whether Catalonia should be a state and, if so, whether it should be an independent state.

Despite the referendum being non-binding, not unlike a straw poll, the government of Spain has the gall to claim that it too is unconstitutional. And while they blast the public with their high minded rhetoric of unity and solidarity, nobody doubts their true motives for preventing this separation:

Proud of their Catalan language and culture, but suffering in an economic crisis, many of the 7.5 million people in Catalonia say they feel short-changed by the central government which redistributes their taxes.

Catalonia was there at the symbolic birth of Spain when Queen Isabella of Castile and King Ferdinand of Aragon, a region that included Catalonia, married in 1469. Now Catalonia accounts for one-fifth of Spain’s total output and an even greater share of its exports.

Catalonia is one of the few regions that gives more than it takes back. Their percentage of the GPD is higher than their percentage of the population, and the people are sick and tired of giving their tax dollars to failing system. They are a region that has historically, been marginalized and persecuted by a central government that doesn’t much care for their customs and institutions. If Catalonia goes, it’s doubtful that the Basques will stick around for much longer. It would essentially put an end to the nation of Spain as we know it, and the drop in tax dollars would push them further over the fiscal cliff.

Moreover, the central government has quietly hinted at the repercussions the Catalans will face, if they attempt to leave Spain:

“Spain is an indissoluble nation. In case of threat of fracture or separatism, according to article 8 of the Spanish Constitution, we have to guarantee the integrity of the territory. Therefore, it is our opinion that we have to declare a state of war or siege.” This is the opinion of the president of the Spanish Military Association (AME), Colonel Leopoldo Muñoz Sánchez. These are the words of Colonel Muñoz who expressed his opinion on behalf of one of the three largest military associations in Spain, who gave an interview regarding the current political issue in Catalonia that was shown on Dutch television channel “Niewsur”

Funny, Section 8 of their constitution talks about defending their sovereignty and independence, but makes no mention secession. I guess violating the spirit and intent of the constitution, isn’t just an American habit.

If the political class in Spain continues to ignore the wishes of their industrious province, and is prepared to violate their own constitution, they may very well have a war on their hands. The last time they had such a war, 500,000 people died, and the nation was left under a fascist dictatorship for nearly 40 years…

spanish civil war

…But no, they can’t just get their fiscal house in order, and let their countrymen leave on friendly terms. They must do everything in their power to keep their passengers at gunpoint, on a sinking ship.

Delivered by The Daily Sheeple


Contributed by Joshua Krause of The Daily Sheeple.

Joshua Krause is a reporter, writer and researcher at The Daily Sheeple. He was born and raised in the Bay Area and is a freelance writer and author. You can follow Joshua’s reports at Facebook or on his personal Twitter. Joshua’s website is Strange Danger .

– See more at: http://www.thedailysheeple.com/catalonian-secession-and-the-approaching-spanish-civil-war_092014#sthash.44D3PvXV.dpuf


VIDEO — Sea of People: Up to 2 million Catalans march for Independence

RT
Sept 11, 2014

Hundreds of thousands of Catalans have flooded the streets of Barcelona in the region’s national day to demand the right to vote on independence from Spain. The demonstrators have formed a big V in red and yellow, symbolizing “vote.


Strange cloud engulfs beach and sends tourists running — video included

Intellihub News
Apr 11, 2014

Days later there is still no explanation behind the massive cloud that swept through a populated beach and frightened tourists

By Staff Writer

ALICANTE, SPAIN (INTELLIHUB) — An ominous cloud randomly swept over a Spanish beach this week, sending many tourists running for their lives.

Witnesses from other local areas also reported similar clouds.  Sightings were reported in Calpe, on the Costa Blanca, and the popular resort of Benidorm.

The scene at Alicante beach was captured by Antonio Carlos Soria Hernandez, who filmed the cloud and posted the video to his facebook page, where it soon when viral.  Mr. Hernandez said that “I saw it and ran down thinking it was exactly that… a fire and caught it on camera, the effect of the cloud is really beautiful.”

The arguments in various comment threads about what was responsible for this smoke have gotten intense and sometimes hostile, as debates on the internet often do.  Some commentators have suggested that this is a natural weather phenomena and that the smoke seen is actually a mist.  While others suggest that this is pollution from some nearby industry.

There are currently dozens of theories as to what caused this large cloud, but none of them have been verified.


1000s stage fresh anti-austerity protests in Spain — video included

PressTV
Apr 4, 2014

[VIDEO]

Tens of thousands of people have demonstrated in cities across Spain in fresh protests against the government’s tough austerity measures.

On Thursday, demonstrations were held in the capital Madrid and 53 other cities by more than 100 organizations, including the country’s top trade unions.

Several thousand people, many waving red-and-white labor union flags, marched through the streets of Madrid, calling for an end to the austerity policies.

The protests came amid highly unpopular tax rises, public salary freezes and spending cuts, which the government has been implementing to reduce its public deficit under pressure from the European Union.

Spain has promised the EU it will lower the public deficit to 5.8 percent of gross domestic product (GDP) this year, 4.2 percent next year and 2.8 percent in 2016.

The demonstrations were held ahead of a major march planned in Brussels by the European Trade Union Confederation to demand an end to the austerity drive across the EU.

Official figures show Spain’s public debt increased to a new record high last year despite numerous budget-cutting measures implemented due to financial crisis.

According to data released by the Spanish central bank on March 14, the government’s debt reached 93.9 percent of the GDP in 2013. The figure showed a sharp rise compared to the previous record of 86 percent registered a year earlier.

Spain has been struggling to deal with its worst economic crisis since World War II, which has left millions of Spaniards jobless and unable to make a living.

A fifth of the country’s population is living under the poverty threshold as defined by Eurostat, the EU’s statistics office. The dearth of jobs and the deepest austerity in more than 30 years have pushed average household income down 10 percent since 2008.

Prime Minister Mariano Rajoy’s government has been sharply criticized over its austerity measures.

Spaniards have staged numerous protests against the government’s spending cuts, arguing that austerity measures have resulted in more job losses in recent years.

MN/MHB/SS


If You Are Waiting For An “Economic Collapse”, Just Look At What Is Happening To Europe

by Michael Snyder
TheEconomicCollapseBlog.com
Jan 8, 2014

If you are anxiously awaiting the arrival of the “economic collapse”, just open up your eyes and look at what is happening in Europe.  The entire continent is a giant economic mess right now.  Unemployment and poverty levels are setting record highs, car sales are setting record lows, and there is an ocean of bad loans and red ink everywhere you look.  Over the past several years, most of the attention has been on the economic struggles of Greece, Spain and Portugal and without a doubt things continue to get even worse in those nations.  But in 2014 and 2015, Italy and France will start to take center stage.  France has the 5th largest economy on the planet, and Italy has the 9th largest economy on the planet, and at this point both of those economies are rapidly falling to pieces.  Expect both France and Italy to make major headlines throughout the rest of 2014.  I have always maintained that the next major wave of the economic collapse would begin in Europe, and that is exactly what is happening.  The following are just a few of the statistics that show that an “economic collapse” is happening in Europe right now…

-The unemployment rate in the eurozone as a whole is still sitting at an all-time record high of 12.1 percent.

-It Italy, the unemployment rate has soared to a brand new all-time record high of 12.7 percent.

-The youth unemployment rate in Italy has jumped up to 41.6 percent.

-The level of poverty in Italy is now the highest that has ever been recorded.

-Many analysts expect major economic trouble in Italy over the next couple of years.  The President of Italy is openly warning of “widespread social tension and unrest” in his nation in 2014.

-Citigroup is projecting that Italy’s debt to GDP ratio will surpass 140 percent by the year 2016.

-Citigroup is projecting that Greece’s debt to GDP ratio will surpass 200 percent by the year 2016.

-Citigroup is projecting that the unemployment rate in Greece will reach 32 percent in 2015.

-The unemployment rate in Spain is still sitting at an all-time record high of 26.7 percent.

-The youth unemployment rate in Spain is now up to 57.7 percent – even higher than in Greece.

-The percentage of bad loans in Spain has risen for eight straight months and recently hit a brand new all-time record high of 13 percent.

-The number of mortgage applications in Spain has fallen by 90 percent since the peak of the housing boom.

-The unemployment rate in France has risen for 9 quarters in a row and recently soared to a new 16 year high.

-For 2013, car sales in Europe were on pace to hit the lowest yearly level ever recorded.

-Deutsche Bank, probably the most important bank in Germany, is the most highly leveraged bank in Europe (60 to 1) and it has approximately 70 trillion dollars worth of exposure to derivatives.

Europe truly is experiencing an economic nightmare, and it is only going to get worse.

It would be hard to put into words the extreme desperation that unemployed workers throughout Europe are feeling right now.  When you can’t feed your family and you can’t find work no matter how hard you try, it can be absolutely soul crushing.

[READ THE FULL ARTICLE]


VIDEO — Worldwide Worker Woes: May Day clashes in Germany, Spain, Colombia, Chile

Russia Today
May 2,2013

Millions took to the streets to take part in May 1 demonstrations around the globe. From union rallies to protests and clashes with police, the International Labor Day events drew attention to the issues of austerity, unemployment and workers rights. READ MORE: http://on.rt.com/uvup14

In the video: Germany 00:0101:39, Spain 01:4002:05, Colombia 02:0602:33, Chile 02:3403:22

Video from RT’s Ruptly video agency ruptly.tv: 00:0101:39 & 02:0603:22

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Over 140 people arrested, dozens injured in Spain as mass protests sweep across Europe [videos included]

Russia Today
November 14, 2012

[VIDEOS]

Over 140 people have been arrested and 74 injured, including 43 police officers, as Spanish police react swiftly to reports of property damage and disorderly behavior while mass protests that began in Spain continue to roll out across the EU.

­A wave of anti-austerity anger is sweeping across Europe. Spain and Portugal are undergoing general strikes, whereas Greece and Italy are seeing many walkouts.

In Spain – the fourth-biggest eurozone economy, yet with one in four workers unemployed – activists and unions have staged an evening rally outside the parliament in the capital, Madrid.

Police have reportedly fired rubber bullets to disperse protesters in Barcelona and Madrid.

According to the Interior Ministry, at least 142 people have been detained across Spain throughout the day and some 74 were injured in clashes.

Among those detained were a man and a woman from Madrid who were allegedly carrying material to build a bomb, including gasoline, nails, screws and a firecracker, El Mondo reports.

There were more sporadic clashes between riot police and protesters as thousands continued to gather on the central square of Puerta del Sol. Baton-yielding riot police were seen chasing hostile protesters down a central thoroughfare near city hall, where many of the shops have been shuttered in anticipation of potential riots.

After a tense face-off between protesters and a police cordon near the iconic Plaza de Cibeles Square, demonstrators have finally backed down for the time being. RT’s Sara Firth tweeted from the scene: “Just coming off Colon square in Madrid and have heard police are charging at Neptuno Square.”

A total of 232 flights have been canceled across Spain due to the general strike.

Policemen clash with demonstrators during a general strike on November 14, 2012 in Madrid. (AFP Photo / Dominique Faget)
Policemen clash with demonstrators during a general strike on November 14, 2012 in Madrid. (AFP Photo / Dominique Faget)

Most of the anger has been concentrated on Prime Minister Mariano Rajoy, whose cuts in health, education and welfare benefits continue. Rajoy, who won a landslide election victory a year ago, is wrestling with the second-largest budget deficit in the euro region while trying to revive the economy from a five-year slump that pushed the jobless rate to 26 per cent. He is trying to avoid following Portugal, Greece and Ireland into seeking a sovereign bailout. Outrage is also growing over Spaniards losing their homes for failing to keep up with mortgage payments.

In Portugal, roughly 40 towns and cities are being called upon to protest. Strikes are being held to protest measures including wage and pension cuts. State-owned airline TAP SGPS SA has canceled flights. Lisbon’s Metro service was shut and state-owned train operator CP-Comboios de Portugal said most trains will not run.

Italian unions, too, are urging a four-hour work stoppage.

Transportation and shipping will be disrupted throughout the day due to staggered, four-hour walkouts. A nationwide strike will see Italy’s railway employees cease work, while maritime workers are also expected to delay departure times of ships and ferries by four hours. The biggest protest will be held in Rome and is expected to involve around 3,000 protestors.

Demonstrators march during a protest on a day of mobilisation against austerity measures by workers in southern Europe on November 14, 2012 in Rome. (AFP Photo / Andreas Solaro)
Demonstrators march during a protest on a day of mobilisation against austerity measures by workers in southern Europe on November 14, 2012 in Rome. (AFP Photo / Andreas Solaro)

Greece has called a three-hour walkout and a rally in Athens, as recent decisions by the government to further cuts spending in a bid to secure another tranche of bailout money have not gone down well. Greece has been at the crux of the eurozone crisis, with the country continuously tinkering with a possible default. This past week the government has been trying to further cut spending in order to secure another bailout.

It’s the first time the European Trade Union Confederation has appealed for a day of action that includes simultaneous strike action in four countries and further protests in other countries.

Other countries have also staged walkouts.

The synchronized and simultaneous strikes and protests have already grounded flights, forced schools to close and have shut down transport.

Policemen clash with demonstrators during a general strike on November 14, 2012 in Madrid. (AFP Photo / Dominique Faget)
Policemen clash with demonstrators during a general strike on November 14, 2012 in Madrid. (AFP Photo / Dominique Faget)
Policemen clash with demonstrators during a general strike on November 14, 2012 in Madrid. (AFP Photo / Dominique Faget)
Policemen clash with demonstrators during a general strike on November 14, 2012 in Madrid. (AFP Photo / Dominique Faget)
Police detain a man as picketers and protesters clashed with police during a 24-hour nationwide general strike in Madrid, November 14, 2012. (AFP Photo / Dominique Faget)
Police detain a man as picketers and protesters clashed with police during a 24-hour nationwide general strike in Madrid, November 14, 2012. (AFP Photo / Dominique Faget)
Policemen clash with a demonstrator during a general strike on November 14, 2012 in Madrid. (AFP Photo / Dominique Faget)
Policemen clash with a demonstrator during a general strike on November 14, 2012 in Madrid. (AFP Photo / Dominique Faget)

Engdahl: Germany Enforces Same Austerity that Paved Way to Third Reich [video]

Global Research TV
October 31, 2012

One in four people are now officially out of work in Spain as unemployment in the debt-ridden country reaches another record. The grim news comes as Madrid’s transport workers go on strike, adding to a sixth day of protests in the capital against austerity cuts.

That’s as another epicentre of the EU crisis – Greece – looks likely to miss its promised deficit deadline. The forecast from the International Monetary Fund’s debt inspectors comes a year after EU leaders applauded what they considered a key deal to save Athens.

Author and publicist F. William Engdahl, says all the measures the EU leaders are imposing are failing to address the core problems on the continent.

“Those banks remain the source of the problem. There is no landing going on to the real economy, and that`s the root cause of the 25 per cent unemployment in Spain and Greece and elsewhere across the EU,” he stated.

Originally aired on RT, October 26, 2012
http://rt.com/news/spain-unemployment-record-high-312/


Stop Imperialism – Episode 43 [audio]

by Eric Draitser
Stop Imperialism
– Episode 43
September 29, 2012

img43.jpg

In today’s episode:

1. Austerity in Europe  –  ‘NO’! Thousands flood Madrid in second day of anti-cuts demos

2. Syria  –  Syria rebels struggle to advance in new Aleppo offensive

3. Iran  –  Netanyahu: ‘Clear red line’ needed to stop Iran’s nuclear program

4. Pakistan (Diplomacy)  –  Pakistan endorses drones, rejects method: Khar

5. Pakistan (Balochistan)  –  Quelling conspiracy in Balochistan

6. Oil, Gas & Pipelines  –  Russia, Venezuela set up joint venture to develop Orinoco Oil Belt

7. Under the Radar  –  3-D printing: A technology on the make?

 

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Intense Unrest in Spain [video]

YouTube — idahopicker
September 26, 2012

This is breaking out in most ALL countries around world.

[hat tip: WeAreChange ]