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The New Occultism: Choas Magic, Discordianism and Transhumanism — DOCUMENTARY included

via Conspiracy School
by David Livingstone

09/07/2015

Arise!: the SubGenius Video, a 1992 spoof documentary covering the Church of the SubGenius

Neopaganism

Because the focus of much conspiracy research has been dirverted to the Federal Reserve, UFOs, “the Jews” and even the Jesuits, it has failed to apprehend the most important development of occultism in modern times and the source of transhumanism.

Until recently, occultism was dominated by societies like the Golden Dawn, or Aleister Crowley’s OTO. While the influences of these societies are still central, they have proliferated in entirely new ways. While once associated with solemn candlelit rituals and dark incantations performed by robed mystics, occultism has a new face, and it’s the pranksterism of a bizarre parody religion called Discordianism, founded by a close friend of Lee Harvey Oswald, Kerry Thornley.

The principles of Discordianism are mockery. But it’s jocularity hides a more sinister agenda, which is the prejudice that nothign is sacred, underlying their bigroty towards “traditional religions.”

The principles of Discordianism were in part developed in The Illuminatus! Trilogy, speculative fiction novels co-authored by Robert Anton Wilson and Robert Shea. But Discordianism began with Greg Hill (aka Malaclypse the Younger or Mal-2) and Kerry Thornley (aka Omar Khayyam Ravenhurst or Lord Omar), who were drawn together by their common interest in humanism, atheism, black magic, hypnotism and their own deranged sense of humor. The Discordian Society was founded after the 1965 publication of its first holy book, the Principia Discordia.

According to historian Carole Cusack, the modern pagan revival is largely understood to be the result of the influence of Gerald Gardner, the founder of Wicca, whose rituals were developed with Aleister Crowley.[1] Whenever something goes wrong, pagans will typically pronounce, “Hail Discordia!” in reverence of the goddess of chaos of Discordianism. Margot Adler in Drawing Down the Moon, which provided the first comprehensive look at modern nature-based religions in the US, credits Thornley for being the first to coin the word “pagan” to refer to the various occult movements who paraded themselves as “nature” religions.

The modern popularization of the terms “pagan” and “neopagan,” as they are currently understood, is largely traced to Oberon Zell-Ravenheart, co-founder of the Church of All Worlds (CAW), which was heavily influenced by Discordianism. CAW was influenced by OTO member Robert Heinlein’s science-fiction novel Stranger in a Strange Land. In the science-fiction novel, a Martian-raised human named Michael Valentine Smith founded The Church of All Worlds, preached sexual freedom and the truth of all religions, and is martyred by narrow-minded people who are not ready for his teachings.”[2]

Killing the King

Thornley was deeply implicated in the strange and murky world of the assassination of JFK, which has often been suspected by conspiracy theorists as representing the ancient pagan right of killing the “sacred king.” Like Oswald, Kerry later served at Atsugi Air Base in Japan, the CIA’s headquarters in the Far East, as a radar technician, though they were not stationed at the same time. Kerry’s experience with the consequent mayhem and insubordination that predominated at the base was recounted in The Idle Warriors. While he seemed unaware of it, the rambunctious atmosphere was obviously the result of the unwitting use of LSD. Since the early 1950s, Atsugi served as one of two overseas field stations where the CIA conducted extensive MK-Ultra testing with LSD.[3]

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