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Comics and the Occult

via Conspiracy School
by David Livingstone
Jan 26, 2016

Superheroes

Occultists have infiltrated and greatly influenced many aspects of popular culture, from Hollywood to popular music, but the clearest articulation of their influence is to be found in the world of comic books, where it has contributed to a nihilism which results in homoerotic interpretations of masculinity and the gross objectification of women.

Along with its enduring association with science fiction, no idea better embodies the absurd aspirations of transhumanism than the superhero. The superhero of popular culture was knowingly derived from the Greek word for demi-god, representing the occult ideal of transcending human existence to become god-like, while performing superhuman feats, likened to magic.

Modern superhero comic books are descendants of “hero pulps” of pulp magazines, which featured illustrated novel-length stories of heroic characters, such as The Shadow, Doc Savage, and The Phantom Detective. It was the introduction of Jerry Siegel and Joe Shuster’s Superman in 1938 that turned comic books into a major industry, and ushered the Golden Age of Comics, which originated the archetype of the superhero.

As shown by Rabbi Weinstein in Up, Up, and Oy Vey: How Jewish History, Culture and Values Shaped the Comic Book Superhero, most of the early creators of superheroes were Jews. In addition to Jerry Siegel and Joe Shuster’s Superman in 1938, there was Batman in 1939, by Bob Kane (Robert Kahn) and Captain America in 1940 by Jack Kirby (Jacob Kurtzberg). For the late comic-book artist Will Eisner, the Jewish people, faced with the rise of fascism, “needed a hero who could protect us against an almost invincible force.”[1]

But these were of course not orthodox, but occult-oriented Jews. As indicated by Jeffrey T. Iverson in “In Search of Superman’s Inner Jew” for Time Magazine, “their superheroes reflected some of the identity they were masking, evoking Jewish concepts such as tikkun olam… and legends such as the Golem of Prague, the medieval superhero of Jewish folklore who was conjured from clay by a rabbi to defend his community when it was under threat.”[2]

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